bizarre guitars

Stories about the weird and wonderful world of guitars.

Bass weirdness

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Weirdomatic.com have assembled a motley collection of weird bass guitars, from alt.guitar.bass , and Ed Roman's Website. Which do you think is weirdest?

Their weirdness scale appears to rely on a combination of strange body shapes (animals, fruit ), unusual finish (furry ZZ-Top style), unusual body materials (Plexiglas), and extra necks or strings.

Matchstick guitar

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In Victorian times matchsticks were used as a sort of wooden Lego. Using small pieces as building blocks elaborate structures can be assembled, without the need for specialised woodworking tools. Using this technique Englishman Jack Hall make a guitar, mandolins, ukulele, banjo and other instruments out of matchsticks. The acoustic guitar, made in 1937, used 25,000 matchsticks.

12 necked Stratocaster

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Like radioactive giraffes, guitars have been sprouting extra necks for some time now. Witness Jimmy Page's double neck SG on live versions of “Stairway To Heaven” or the guy out of Cheap Trick with his many-necked guitar. Some guitarists have exploited the extra necks to musical effect, like ambidextrous virtuoso Michael Angelo.

Guitar Robots

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Guitar robots anyone? Take a look at GuitarBot – built as part of the League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots (LEMUR) project by Eric Singer, Kevin Larke and David Bianciardi. The aim of the project was to create an electric slide guitar, with all the dynamics capabilities of a human player but with the potential to exceed the physical limitations of any human player. Guitarbot can play for longer and faster than any human and has an unlimited amount of fingers

The ultimate travel guitar

The worlds smallest guitar

This is a picture of the world's smallest six string guitar made at the Cornell Nanofabrication Facility. It is 10 micrometers long , the size of a single cell. The whole thing was made of silicon, as a demonstration of resonance and vibration at nano-scales. Harold Craighead, the director of the facility at the time described how it works,

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